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Zip Code’s Impact on Human Health

Airaksinen, Jaakko, Christian Hakulinen, Laura Pulkki-Råback, Terho Lehtimäki, Olli T. Raitakari, Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen, and Markus Jokela. 2016. “Neighborhood Effects in Health Behaviors: A Test of Social Causation with Repeat-Measurement Longitudinal Data.” The European Journal of Public Health 26 (3): 417-421. Web.

This article examines how the characteristics of the neighborhood where people live are related to their health status and habits. The authors of the work are employees of the Institute of Behavioural Sciences and specialists in chemistry and medicine, which confirms the competence of the study. According to Airaksinen et al. (2016), people living in areas with more urban zip codes were more likely to smoke and drink alcohol. The study results support the hypothesis that differences in place of residence affect people’s health behavior. The research was based on a survey and subsequent statistical analysis. Thus, the content of the article is entirely consistent with the examination question.

Goodwin, Andrew J., Nandita R. Nadig, James T. McElligott, Kit N. Simpson, and Dee W. Ford. 2016. “Where You Live Matters: The Impact of Place of Residence on Severe Sepsis Incidence and Mortality.” Chest 150 (4): 829-836. Web.

This paper raises the question of the effect of where a person lives on the incidence of sepsis. The authors are the Medical University of South Carolina employees, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy, and Sleep Medicine. Medically underserved regions consist of marginalized populations with limited physician services (Goodwin et al. 2016, 830). The authors identified people from the U.S. Census database who were hospitalized with severe sepsis in local hospitals and checked the level of medical care in their area of residence. As a result of the study, the connection between these characteristics was confirmed. Since the research topic is the effect of zip code on a person’s health, this article relates to the study subject and helps to explore the issue more precisely.

Graham, Garth N. 2016. “Why Your ZIP Code Matters More Than Your Genetic Code: Promoting Healthy Outcomes from Mother to Child.” Breastfeeding Medicine: The Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine 11: 396–397. Web.

This article raises the need to develop a new approach to improving the population’s well-being through the study of geographic factors. According to Graham (2016, 396), it is essential to focus more on the relationship “between where people live (i.e., their ZIP codes) and the quality – and length-of-life they might experience.” The paper’s author is a specialist in the social determinants of health, the director and head of global and public well-being at Google and YouTube. Graham’s work examines new possible approaches to studying population health that consider a broader set of factors, including geography, and offers the necessary tools. These criteria confirm the report’s competence and its correlation to the topic at hand.

Graham, Garth N., MaryLynn Ostrowski, and Alyse Sabina. 2015. “Defeating the ZIP Code Health Paradigm: Data, Technology, and Collaboration Are Key.” Health Affairs. Web.

The paper examines the issue of health inequalities related to geography and the possible social implications. Previous author Garth Graham, along with Mary Lynn Ostrowski, Ph.D., and Alyse Sabina, MPH, raise how life expectancy depends on where one lives (2015). The authors review possible ways to address this issue and provide current data and statistics on the topic. These factors support the relevance and significance of this article to the subject under study.

Holmes, Joshua R., Joshua L. Tootoo, Julia Chosy, Amber Y. Bowie, and Ranjani R. Starr. 2018. “Examining Variation in Life Expectancy Estimates by ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) in Hawaii’s Four Main Counties, 2008–2012.” Preventing Chronic Disease 15: 1-3. Web.

This paper investigates the differences in life expectancy depending on the tabulation of zip codes. According to the report, a person’s zip code can affect their health (Holmes et al. 2018, 2). The analysis was conducted over four years from 2008 to 2012 in four primary counties in Hawaii. The authors of the study are Masters of Health and Ph. This paper is relevant to the topic under investigation, and the results are crucial for further research on the issue.

Obuobi, Shirlene, Danielle Belardo, and Martha Gulati. 2021. “The Precision of Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Begins with a ZIP Code.” Journal of the American College of Cardiology 3 (6): 982–984. Web.

The authors of this paper are employees of various U.S. universities in the field of medicine. They investigate the issue of cardiovascular disease and its relationship to where a person lives. Obuobi, Belardo, and Gulati (2021) argue that when evaluating factors that negatively affect a patient’s health, an assessment of the geographical aspect is necessary: housing stability, transportation limitations, and more. This article explores human health in a more substantive and specific way, contributing to a detailed study of the chosen topic.

Qwaider, Yasmeen Z., Naomi M. Sell, Chloe Boudreau, Caitlin E. Stafford, Rocco Ricciardi, Christy E. Cauley, Liliana G. Bordeianou, David L. Berger, Hiroko Kunitake, and Robert N. Goldstone. 2021. “ZIP Code-Related Income Disparities in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.” The American Surgeon. Web.

The authors of this study examine the impact of where one lives on one’s health more narrowly: they raise the issue of income inequality among patients with colorectal cancer and link it with zip codes. According to Qwaider et al. (2021), if people with the disease live in low-income areas, they “are screened less, receive adjuvant chemotherapy less, and have worse outcomes.” This study is relevant; the information and results help expand knowledge in this area and explore the topic in more detail.

Ritchie, Dannie. 2013. “Our ZIP Code May Be More Important Than Our Genetic Code: Social Determinants of Health, Law and Policy.” Rhode Island Medical Journal 96 (7): 14. Web.

This paper raises the possibility that the zip code may be more important than the genetic code. The report’s author is a clinical assistant professor of family medicine at Brown University Center for Primary Care and Prevention. According to Ritchie (2013), there is a need to examine how disparities affect all people in different demographic groups. The article proposes a new approach to address limited health care services based on geographic location. Thus, the content of the paper is entirely consistent with the research question.

Seavey, John W. 2008. “How’s Your Health? What’s Your ZIP Code? Poverty and Health.” The University Dialogue 42. Web.

There is a direct link between a person’s status within the social system and health, and the place of residence is an essential factor here. John Seavey, Ph.D., M.D., and author of this article, argues (2008) that people living in poor areas are more frequently exposed to a variety of diseases. He reveals the correlation between a person’s income and health and also raises policy questions. This paper presents important questions that force a broader view of the topic under study.

Slade-Sawyer, Penelope. 2014. “Is Health Determined by Genetic Code or ZIP Code? Measuring the Health of Groups and Improving Population Health.” North Carolina Medical Journal, 75 (6): 394-397. Web.

Maintaining a decent level of health care is a fundamental goal of government. According to Slade-Sawyer (2014), former director of public health in North Carolina, the government needs to address not only the social aspects but also the geographical factor to improve the health care system. A person’s well-being is often associated with their genetic code, whereas the focus needs to shift to their zip code. This paper reveals this point, and accordingly, its content corresponds to the subject of the research.

References

Airaksinen, Jaakko, Christian Hakulinen, Laura Pulkki-Råback, Terho Lehtimäki, Olli T. Raitakari, Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen, and Markus Jokela. 2016. “Neighborhood Effects in Health Behaviors: A Test of Social Causation with Repeat-Measurement Longitudinal Data.” The European Journal of Public Health 26 (3): 417-421. Web.

Goodwin, Andrew J., Nandita R. Nadig, James T. McElligott, Kit N. Simpson, and Dee W. Ford. 2016. “Where You Live Matters: The Impact of Place of Residence on Severe Sepsis Incidence and Mortality.” Chest 150 (4): 829-836. Web.

Graham, Garth N. 2016. “Why Your ZIP Code Matters More Than Your Genetic Code: Promoting Healthy Outcomes from Mother to Child.” Breastfeeding Medicine: The Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine 11: 396–397. Web.

Graham, Garth N., MaryLynn Ostrowski, and Alyse Sabina. 2015. “Defeating the ZIP Code Health Paradigm: Data, Technology, and Collaboration Are Key.” Health Affairs. Web.

Holmes, Joshua R., Joshua L. Tootoo, Julia Chosy, Amber Y. Bowie, and Ranjani R. Starr. 2018. “Examining Variation in Life Expectancy Estimates by ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) in Hawaii’s Four Main Counties, 2008–2012.” Preventing Chronic Disease 15: 1-3. Web.

Obuobi, Shirlene, Danielle Belardo, and Martha Gulati. 2021. “The Precision of Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Begins with a ZIP Code.” Journal of the American College of Cardiology 3 (6): 982–984. Web.

Qwaider, Yasmeen Z., Naomi M. Sell, Chloe Boudreau, Caitlin E. Stafford, Rocco Ricciardi, Christy E. Cauley, Liliana G. Bordeianou, David L. Berger, Hiroko Kunitake, and Robert N. Goldstone. 2021. “ZIP Code-Related Income Disparities in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.” The American Surgeon. Web.

Ritchie, Dannie. 2013. “Our ZIP Code May Be More Important Than Our Genetic Code: Social Determinants of Health, Law and Policy.Rhode Island Medical Journal 96 (7): 14. Web.

Seavey, John W. 2008. “How’s Your Health? What’s Your ZIP Code? Poverty and Health.” The University Dialogue 42. Web.

Slade-Sawyer, Penelope. 2014. “Is Health Determined by Genetic Code or ZIP Code? Measuring the Health of Groups and Improving Population Health.” North Carolina Medical Journal, 75 (6): 394-397. Web.

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"Zip Code’s Impact on Human Health." OctoStudy, 28 Oct. 2022, octostudy.com/zip-codes-impact-on-human-health/.

1. OctoStudy. "Zip Code’s Impact on Human Health." October 28, 2022. https://octostudy.com/zip-codes-impact-on-human-health/.


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OctoStudy. "Zip Code’s Impact on Human Health." October 28, 2022. https://octostudy.com/zip-codes-impact-on-human-health/.

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OctoStudy. 2022. "Zip Code’s Impact on Human Health." October 28, 2022. https://octostudy.com/zip-codes-impact-on-human-health/.

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OctoStudy. (2022) 'Zip Code’s Impact on Human Health'. 28 October.

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